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Mexico City updates 911 app to push quake alerts to phones

MEXICO CITY (AP) - Mexico City has updated its 911 emergency app to send earthquake alerts to residents' smartphones following last month's magnitude 7.1 shake that killed 228 people in the capital.





Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera announced Thursday that users of the 911 CDMX app can now get alerts for any quake strong enough how to download showbox - https://newshowbox.com threaten damage in the city. It's available for both iOS and Android.





More than 20 million people live in the capital and surrounding suburbs, much of which is built on a former lakebed. Its soil can amplify the effects of earthquakes that strike far away and whose shockwaves arrive in the sprawling metropolis some time later.





In this Monday, Oct. 30, 2017 photo, people take photos of a papier-mache skeleton wearing a rescue personnel vest, raising his fist, symbolizing a volunteer who worked in the aftermath of the Sept. earthquake, as part of a Day of the Dead altar honoring earthquake victims at the Zocalo in Mexico City. Mexico's traditional Day of the Dead is opening with a sadder tone than usual, in the wake of the deadly Sept. 19 quake. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)





Mancera said there would be no demonstration of the system to avoid rattling nerves still raw from the Sept. 19 earthquake.

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What made the rain in Hurricane Harvey so extreme

People are rescued from a flooded neighborhood after it was inundated with rain water, remnants of Hurricane Harvey, on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in areas of Texas over the next couple of days. Scott Olson/Getty Images





Fifty inches of rain. Nine trillion gallons of water. The Gulf Coast of Texas, and especially the Houston metropolitan area, has been inundated by rain produced by Hurricane Harvey.





And as of this writing, the rain continues along a broad swath of the Gulf Coast, with a flood threat extending all the way east through New Orleans to the Florida Panhandle.





Even for one of the wettest and most flood-prone parts of the United States, the rainfall totals and flooding are breaking records. So, what has made Harvey such a prodigious rain producer?





A 'train' of rainstorms


The amount of rain that falls at a given location can be boiled down to a surprisingly simple equation: The total precipitation equals the average rainfall rate, multiplied by the rainfall duration. In other words, the most rain falls where it rains the hardest for the longest.





Tropical cyclones in general are very efficient rain producers, because they draw large quantities of water vapor into the atmosphere from a warm ocean. That moist air rises and the water vapor condenses, and a large fraction of that water falls as rain. Tropical cyclones can also last a long time; if their motion slows, then a particular region can experience that heavy rainfall for multiple days.





Left panel: Rainfall accumulation for four days ending Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017 at 9 a.m. CDT. Right panel: Rainfall forecast for the 24 hours from 9 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 29 to 9 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 30. The National Weather Service said forecasters needed to change their usual color scale to illustrate the extreme rainfall amounts in Texas. National Weather Service





Even compared to other tropical cyclones, the rain from Harvey has been very hard, and gone for a very long time. On Saturday evening (August 26) into Sunday morning (August 27), an intense band of storms developed to the east of Harvey's center, and lined itself bien hop den up right over Houston. This is a process known as "echo training," in which it appears that the individual thunderstorm cells are like train cars that repeatedly pass over the same spot and bring with them heavy precipitation.





This precipitation band was producing up to six inches of rain per hour - an extremely high rate - and it remained over the Houston metro area for several hours, with a couple more that followed immediately after. One location just southeast of downtown Houston recorded 13.84 inches in just three hours. These rains from Saturday night into Sunday morning initiated the massive flooding in the Houston metro area.





Image from NOAA's GOES-16 satellite at 9:42 p.m. CDT on August 26, 2017. Infrared image shows the temperature of cloud tops, with red and black colors indicating very intense thunderstorms. Colorado State University/Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere





Your browser does not support the video tag. RadarScopePro/KHGX Houston Animation from the Houston, Texas National Weather Service radar on Saturday evening, August 26, 2017. The left panel shows radar reflectivity, which is related to rainfall intensity. The right panel shows radial velocity (green colors toward the radar, red colors away). The green polygons show flash flood warnings issued by the NWS, including a rare ‘flash flood emergency' for Houston.

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